Frequently asked questions

Instructions for Registration


1) Visit the competition suite website and login into your account. If you do not have a competition suite account please make one.

2) Log into your account and click the Find My Group button in the top left corner of the screen.

3) Fill in part of the name of your group and click Find My Group.
For instance, if your group's name is "NYC Percussion Junior Varsity" you can search for "NYC". If your search is too general, you will be asked to be more specific. If you can't find your group, please contact the organization hosting the event.
4) Click Request Access next to the correct group (make sure you do this for guard and percussion as needed)

5) The button will change to orange and say Access Pending.


I will periodically check competition suite and approve pending request. Once you are approved as an administrator you can then add your staff members as needed.

If you have a new program who has not competed with SVWAA please email admin@svwaa.com and I will create a group for you.




Classification Breakdown


Regional A Class

There is a broad spectrum of levels within the Regional A Class. Here we find performers who are experiencing their first set of skills at a body and equipment level and journey through the developmental levels that take them to the point where they are ready to move into the higher, more challenging A Class.

This class is unique because of the makeup of member guards. It is common to find groups ranging from elementary school age, intermediate school age and even beginning high school groups. In some instances there could be a group with a varsity level in the A Class while these younger less experienced students comprise their Regional A guard. As a result of this, their ages range from as young as 7 or 8 to as high as 18 in the Scholastic Regional A Class and up to 22 years of age in the Independent Regional A Class. While the latter is not common for Independent Regional A guards, it nonetheless is a possibility.

Many circuits will offer multiple classes within the Regional A category to create a more equitable, level competitive field. As our activity grows, this class has become a large population for most circuits.

WGI does not offer competition at the World Championships for this class; however, they are welcomed at the Regional level of competition. Because of this, there is no formal review process for Regional A guards. This opens the class to a wider range of unintended possibilities for experience. This makes the emphasis on basic tenants of each caption and the reward of achievement key to the judging process in order to maintain the intent of the class.

As of the 2013 season, WGI is including Regional A guards in Regional Finals. This does NOT include the WGI Elite Events. WGI is preparing for this expansion in a number of ways, one being a flexible scoring system that allows for growth and inclusion for this class and others.

In the Regional A Class WGI emphasizes training. Reward is driven by the understanding and achievement of the principles of each caption. This emphasis on training should be accompanied by a limited vocabulary with priorities on establishing solid building blocks on which to develop the skills of the performers.

As of the 2013 season, all score sheets offer a potential of 100 points (tenths) in each sub caption, with Equipment and Movement sub-captions being factored in the tabulation process by the 70/130 ratio: 70 over 100 for Vocabulary and 130 over 100 for Excellence. This maintains the intended emphasis on training and rewards those units that are strategic with an eye towards excellence and achievement. This tabulation factoring allows for the flexibility to shift these percentages in the near future as the Regional A class grows and becomes an integral part of the WGI’s performance opportunities. This factoring will allow for a more consistent approach for judges as we further distinguish the emphasis in all classes as they develop and change through the coming years.

Training materials will be available for Equipment and Movement judges to understand how numbers will be factored and the potential for shifts in ranking relative to this tabulation factoring. Judges are still expected to be accountable for their raw score as well as their factored score understanding the need for proper profiling to give the competitive edge to those units being strategic with an eye towards training and excellence.

As of the 2013 season, Equipment and Movement scores in the Regional A Class will be given in two decimal places in anticipation of tighter spreads in vocabulary. This insures that the judges’ sub-caption ranking is intact through the factoring process. This extra decimal now shifts the tolerance for sub-caption ties away from the flexibility of recent years.

A Class

The look of the A Class has changed significantly over the past four years. The natural evolution of the activity now yields shows and performers who are progressing up the range of equipment and body skills beyond what is common a few years ago. You will see this reflected in the class descriptive at the top of the A Class score sheets. This class also has a broad spectrum of development within its population. Many circuits will divide their A Class membership into ‘sub classes’ to provide a more balanced competitive opportunity. There is even an interim scoring application available for those guards who are still discovering and developing their skills in the bottom half of the class. This has been offered to WGI Circuit Partners.

Scholastic A guards will range in age from 14-18 years. Independent A guards can range from any starting age up to 22 years. This variance creates a difference in the look between Scholastic and Independent A guards, mostly because of physical maturity and the accompanying skill level usually associated with issues of strength. The Independent A guards will usually have a wider range of development from performer to performer making issues of training and experience key factors in the class. It is this developmental training factor that is the shared quality between the A classes.

Like the Regional A Class, the emphasis in A Class is on the understanding and achievement of the tenants and principles in each caption.

At the programming level, success is seen in choices that lead the performers understanding and achievement of excellence. Designers are sensitive to musical selections that offer clear guidelines for the performers to follow. Programming choices consider tempo, dynamic changes, and points of audio impact that help these younger performers develop their range of performance skills in all captions.

In this class we look for the layering of equipment on some body and some phrases done while traveling. Phrases will begin to lengthen, showing the performers’ skills in this area. Standard tosses will normally top out at quads or lower with an occasional individual who may be spotlighted with a more challenging aerial. When considering the Independent A Class, remember that skills focusing on strength can be slightly higher. Achievement must drive the reward for these choices.

Staging choices will provide the performers with the opportunity to show growing comprehension of challenging spatial relationships, speed/method of moving and orientation.

As the guards evolve within the class, they will add to their design and vocabularies’ range taking on greater challenges as they prepare for the ultimate advancement into Open Class. At the highest level of A Class, those whose students have mastered basic skills will be offered the opportunity to demonstrate some intermediate Open Class skills, usually in the area of Equipment.

Like the Regional A Class, as of the 2013 season, all score sheets offer a potential of 100 points (tenths) in each sub caption, with Equipment and Movement sub captions being factored in the tabulation process by the 70/130 ratio: 70 over 100 for Vocabulary and 130 over 100 for Excellence. This maintains the intended emphasis on training and rewards those units that are strategic with an eye towards excellence and achievement. This tabulation factoring allows for the flexibility to shift these percentages in the near future as the A Class grows and possible shifts towards a different weighting of reward are needed. This factoring will allow for a more consistent approach for judges as we further distinguish the emphasis in all classes as they develop and change through the coming years.

Training materials will be available for Equipment and Movement judges to understand how numbers will be factored and the potential for shifts in ranking relative to this tabulation factoring. Judges are still expected to be accountable for their raw score as well as their factored score understanding the need for proper profiling to give the competitive edge to those units being strategic with an eye towards training and excellence.

As of the 2013 season, Equipment and Movement Scores in the Regional A Class will be given in two decimal places in anticipation of tighter spreads in vocabulary. This insures that the judge’s sub-caption ranking is in tact through the factoring process. This extra decimal now shifts the tolerance for subcaption ties away from the flexibility of recent years. In addition, WGI is also offering a rating system at Regionals and World Championships for the Scholastic A Class. This will be given based on the final performance of the guard no matter what round of competition. There will be a three-division system with ratings awarded relative to fixed score thresholds that will not change through the season:
Division I – Superior Division II – Excellent Division III – Good Division IV - Fair 14

Open Class
This exciting class finds guards exploring greater challenges with emphasis on more complex equipment and body skills set in more challenging programs. The maturity and training enforced through the A Class experience allow these guards to explore more demanding equipment and body vocabulary. Standard tosses will be higher, with the higher aerials most commonly fives in Scholastic Open and sixes in Independent Opens. We can expect to see a greater variation on releases and catches as well as a more extended blend with the body. We also can expect to see extended phrasing and the further development of traveling as vocabulary opportunities reflect the shift from ‘transition’ to connect events to ‘development’.

Open Class is where we see the growth in performer’s ability offering greater choreographic choices. We will expect to see this impact all captions, further separating these guards from their A Class counterparts.

This shift in opportunity will challenge not only the students but designers and choreographers as well. This shift in emphasis is reflected in the Open Class scoring system. Unlike the Regional A and A Class, the Open Class scoring system rewards vocabulary and excellence equally in the Equipment and Movement captions, encouraging the exploration of a broader range of vocabulary relative to the growing abilities of the Open Class performer.

Programming and design will show greater exploration into staging and a more developed connection to the audio and physical settings. Individual and group personality, role, characteristics and artistic nuance will be present and understood by the performers. The developing communication skills will lend greater effect to the performance of programs. Broader skills and choice will manifest in a range of stylistic identities as more designers, and choreographers work to be more unique and creative.

With the growing participation of several colleges, and in deference to the typical college students’ age, WGI’s maximum age for the Independent Open Class has been raised to 23. This allows all Independent Open Class students to compete for the duration of their college enrollment.

World Classes
As of the 2013 season, WGI has created separate score sheets for the two World classes. This was done to accommodate differences relative to physical development and performance maturity that have impacted the Equipment and Movement captions, as well as anticipated shifts in all captions for the coming years.

Scholastic World Class
Scholastic World guard members will range in age from 14-18 years. Many times they are the upperclassmen of their school including the most experienced performers. In these cases we will notice more similarities in skill-set from member to member.

Because most of these performers have been together for the duration of their high school years, we see more advanced skills throughout these programs in both equipment and movement. We also notice that skills are connected in more complex ways over longer periods of time.

More performance experience and training make choreographic and design options in this class greater than the other scholastic classes. As a result, expect stronger stylistic identities with a wider range of approaches. This variety can make comparisons in this class more challenging.


These guards have strong defined personalities and are highly creative and unique. Programs are designed to showcase their impressive body and equipment talent. Their depth of training and skills are strong and push the limits of the top of the scholastic classes as this class strives to set new standards.

Independent World Class
Since the removal of the maximum age in the Independent World Class, these groups have elevated the degree of difficulty in the blend of equipment and body set in innovative programs that explore the abstract as well as the literal story of their creations. As of the 2013 season, the score sheet class descriptive in each caption will reflect this:


“Sophisticated challenges emphasize the physical and mental capabilities of these more mature performers.”


Years of performer experience have given designers new options in choreographic and design choices and the collective life experiences of these mature performers have opened the door to limitless programming options considering theme, premise, physical and audio settings. The strength and maturity in the class yield a performer confidence that is reflected in full-out communication of the roles they portray bringing a professional level of performance to the stage. Creativity and imagination are cornerstones in this class.


Separating the scoring sheets for the Independent World Class from the Scholastic World Class is the first step in recognizing the separate standards that have been seen over the last couple of years and set the stage for more specific considerations in all captions in the next couple of years. As of the 2013 season, this is reflected in the movement and equipment vocabulary criteria where the greatest challenges occur. In the comparison questions we ask:


“Whose vocabulary contained the greater difficulty and risk?”


This is intended for us to recognize and reward these considerations of the depth when assessing the overall vocabulary and its achievement. Factoring the full range of depth will be key in this class as these performers experience has pushed their skill sets into the most extreme of skills. Assessing these skills singly without considering the frequency of skills within phrases and how they are connected, over extended time in challenging environs, would undervalue the accomplishments of these expert performers.


This class contains the legacy color guards where creative and technical staffs, and in multiple cases membership, have been together for many years. These years are spent developing and perfecting very specific processes, leading to extended repertoire of skills and hyper-stylized approaches. These compositional and choreographic fingerprints lead to the strong creative identities delivering us the widest variety from unit to unit, creating the crown jewels of the activity.


When defining the standards for this class, we assume that choices are drawn from all possibilities, as this class strives to set new standards.




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